The Lord My Husband

Posted on January 14th, 2013

(The following article is based on Chapter 2 – Ancient Thrones Of Iniquity from my book, Binding the Strongman over America)

 

And it shall be in that day, says the Lord, that you will call MeIshi [my Husband], and you shall no more call Me Baali [my Baal], (Hosea 2: 16, AMP).

 

You may wonder what the words of this Old Testament prophet have to do with Christians in America today. The answer is: more than you can imagine.

 

Baal worship is an ancient form of idolatry that predates Israel’s presence in the Promised Land. God instructed the Israelites to drive out the idol-worshipping inhabitants.

 

But they didn’t do it.

 

Instead of driving them out, those early Israelites married into their families and enjoyed their festivals of worship. Instead of only worshipping God, who delivered them out of Egypt, they worshipped the Baals as well.

 

The fall of Israel began when they decided that God was not only one of the Baals, but the chief of them. The belief was still so pervasive that the Scribes and Pharisees accused Jesus of performing miracles through Beelzebub, a derivative of the name Baal-zebub (CJB).

 

Matthew 12:24 records, “But when the Pharisees heard this, they said, This man casts out demons only by Beelzebub, the ruler of the demons,” (italics mine, NASU).

 

This verse not only identifies Beelzebub as the prince of demons, but also reveals the disturbing fact that hundreds of years after Hosea’s words, the Israelites still attributed the miracles of God to Baal.

 

Mark 3:22 tells us, “The scribes who came down from Jerusalem were saying, ‘He is possessed by Beelzebul,’ and ‘He casts out the demons by the ruler of the demons,’” (NASU)

 

The sad truth is that while those Scribes and Pharisees are long dead, Baal, the ruler of the demons, is still at work on planet Earth. For instance, strange looking hieroglyphs carved into the walls of caves in Oklahoma were verified to be ancient Egyptian. Written in the Ogam language, the translation reads, “We claim this land for Baal.”

 

The face of idolatry has long been hidden in the soil of this country, in religious traditions so old that their origins have been forgotten, and in countless other ways in society.

 

What is the answer?

 

We find the answer in Hosea 2. If we will divorce ourselves from idolatry and “remarry the Lord” God promises what He will do.

 

And I will sow her for Myself anew in the land, and I will have love, pity,and mercy for her who had not obtained love, pity, andmercy; and I will say to those who were not My people, You are My people, and they shall say, You are my God! (Hosea 2: 23, AMP).

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